The Three Main Components Of A Converting Sales Page

by on June 25, 2012 · 35 comments

in Writing Knowledge

You probably have read about what makes a good sales page before.  But really, what is a good sales page?

Well, the answer is easy enough. A good sales page is a sales page (also called sales copy) that converts into sales.  If your sales page converts into sales, it means that it’s got all the right components.

I have seen incredibly good sales pages and I have seen incredibly bad ones, but how can you tell the difference between a good and a bad sales page without knowing if such page have a good conversion or not?

There are three main components that will make your sales page a good one. If you ignore them or even one of them, it’s going to add your sales copy to the list of the none effective sales copies  out there.  And obviously it’s going to affect its conversion.  So, what are those components and what do they do for your page?

The three main components of a converting sales page are:

- The Potential Buyer (the person reading your copy)

- The Product

- The Message

 

So far, it’s easy enough, isn’t it?

I have listed them here by order of importance, but you must consider each one of them as you write your sales copy.  This also works for your articles and even your blog posts.  Pretty much anything you write for the purpose of bringing traffic to it.

First – Consider the Potential Buyer

Why is the potential buyer so important when you are writing a sales copy? Well, if it wasn’t for them, you wouldn’t need to write the sales copy in the first place, would you?  You are writing your copy for “a person”, therefore, it only makes common sense that the potential buyer, the person for whom you are writing your sales page, would be the number one concern in your list.  Seems obvious to you? Well, there are many sales copies out there that are obviously not been written for the potential buyer.

What should you consider when it comes to the potential buyer?

First and foremost, do not underestimate the person that is going to read your page, and give them some credit.  What do I mean by that? Talk to your potential buyer as you would talk to any intelligent person and do not assume that you can feed them some BS while they won’t become aware of it.  More time than not, they will!

Have you ever watch a commercial that is ridiculously stupid and seems to speak to stupid people? How does that make you feel? Are you attracted by such commercials? I know I’m not, and I’m wondering who do they think they are and who do they think their potential buyers are to treat the public that way!  You do not want your sales copy sound like those commercials, do you?

You are not writing for children.  People are not stupid and can tell if you are telling them something worth their time or not.  They will also be able to tell if you are speaking from a true experience or not, and if you are sincere about what you are discussing in your sales letter or not.

Also, don’t forget that nowadays, with a simple Google search, people will be able to find out about your online track records as well.

When you consider the potential buyer you need to remember all the above, and write accordingly.  This is your starting point. Before you start, you must see “the person”, the “human being” for whom you are writing and address them accordingly.

Second – Consider the Product

The second most important item in your sales page is the product, of course. No product and you wouldn’t have to write a sales page either.

When you consider the product, the first and foremost question you need to ask yourself is what type of market needs and want my product?  Once you’re able to answer such question, you can better determine the type of individuals you are writing for and adapt the tone of your writing.

For example, you wouldn’t write using the same tone if you’d write for a mom working at home, for a mechanic or for a lawyer.  In each case you would need to adapt your tone and such tone will pretty much be dictated by the type of product that you are selling and your target market.

The point is that you need to speak of the product to a market that is interested in it.  Your job as a copy writer is not to convince someone that is not interested, but to convince someone that is already interested in buying what you have.

They are your market and you have what they want and need. All you need to do is push the right buttons to SHOW them that.  That’s what you will convey in the message, our last third most important component of the sales page.

Third – Consider the Message

It all comes down to the message, right?  Have you ever heard the expression, it’s not what you say it’s how you say it? That goes for sales copies as well. It’s not what you are saying so much, it’s how you are saying it that is going to make it or break it when it comes to the conversion of your sales page.

Writing about a product is one thing, but writing about it in a convincing or persuasive way is another.  This is what makes the difference between a good copywriter and a not so good one.  However, the one rule of thumb to be able to write a good sales page is playing with the emotion of your potential buyers.

I have mentioned this many times before, but this might be worth repeating here.  People buy more easily what they want than what they need.  The reason why is that people buy based on emotions not based on needs, and that applies especially to products they are looking for online which wouldn’t be something they need to live or survive.

If you know how to play the emotion card in your writing, you’ll get a converting sales page.  The best way to do this is by first, understanding how the person needing your product may feel.  Once you’ve determine what they feel, write about their “pain”, “problem” or “challenge”.  Next, reassure them that there is a solutions.  Then, and only then, give them all the details you want about your product.

So, it’s your turn now.  How do you go about writing your sales pages, your articles, and even your blog posts?  Do tell us in the comment area.

Photobucket

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Article by

Sylviane Nuccio is a professional Freelance Writer and a Life Coach. You can check her writing portfolio right here .

Sylviane has written 156 awesome articles for us at SylvianeNuccio.com

Twitter: @SylvianeNuccio | Facebook | Google+ | Blog → Sylviane Nuccio

{ 35 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Seth June 25, 2012 at 12:19 PM

Hi Sylviane,

This was a very timely article for me since I’m working on a new niche (besides the oh dreaded Internet Marketing). I figured out I could write scam reviews for Internet Marketing for getting good exposure, but I’ve been wanting to do something else anyway & your article applies well to what I’m doing.

I think one of the main topics you hit upon over – “What should you consider when it comes to the potential buyer?” – is very important. All people have to go is search you on the U.S. Census Bureau or type in “scam” or “review” for that product. Chances are if that product isn’t trustworthy & they’ve already scammed a few people, there’s going to be a lot of complaints online it, obviously giving that site a horrible track record.
- What’s most sad about this though is how I’ve seen people advertise via Facebook, then once people would complain about one site, he’d actually transfer all his FTP files to a new domain while keeping both the domains up & advertising the new domain via Facebook. I realize this is an extreme issue, but you aren’t building yourself up like you have done so well yourself.

For your 2nd point, that’s pretty important too. I see many people writing random articles & information over very general topics pertaining to whatever niche they’re advertising – and I’m thinking to myself….WOW. Are you here to goof around or actually make sales to your websites? Nobody is going to buy from your website when you talk about “The Lifestyle of German Shepherd Dogs” when you’re advertising a bathing utensil designed for German Shepherds. I’m sure you get what I’m talking about. :lol: I realize this is often a newbie mistake & I did it myself starting out, but I know you just have to use common sense.

Then for your last point, I think it’s important to say that this is the part where you just need to write well. This is especially true for people trying to advertise products to an intelligent audience. Chances are, people will just leave your site if you give a dim overview of your topic at hand instead of an in depth & detailed overview of what your product is about.
- I often go to big very informative sites over particular subjects like these, sit there & read it a few times to let it soak in, perhaps read 1 or 2 other sources as well, then put it all in my own words. I know this is 1 great solution too doing that. Then of course if you’re already an expert on that subject matter, that’s even more awesome & you can give your own personal thoughts over the matter as well.

Thanks for another great article Sylviane. I enjoy reading your posts.

Reply

2 Sylviane Nuccio June 26, 2012 at 1:30 AM

Hi Seth,

Well, thank you for this post under my post :) I love it. You really took every point and put your own feedbacks and insights.

You’re right you can’t be too general if you want to sell something specific, especially if you want to do it with one article.

Thank you for your super comment, Seth :)

Reply

3 AdrienneTwitter: adriennesmith40 June 25, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Hey Sylviane,

Good post and great info you shared here.

As I was reading your post and you were talking about the commercials, I couldn’t help but shake my head when you were sharing that. I’m not quite sure some people really consider who exactly their target audience is. I know in the beginning though, this was not my strong point either.

It’s always great to get tips from a copywriter because this definitely is not my area of expertise. Thank goodness I have you and a few other friends who do this and very well I might add,

I appreciate you sharing these tips with us. I heard this often but obviously I don’t always apply what I learn. One of these days I’ll get much better in this area.

Thanks Sylviane, you’re always so helpful.

Enjoy your day okay!

~Adrienne
Adrienne invites you to read..Why I Joined Numis NetworkMy Profile

Reply

4 Sylviane Nuccio June 26, 2012 at 1:43 AM

Hi Adrienne,

I think you under estimate yourself, because you do write just fine. You do not try to lie to your readers, you really treat them as “people” and you know how to convey your message. You followers are a proof of that.

I think you are doing great, Adrienne :)

Reply

5 Terry Conti June 25, 2012 at 5:50 PM

Hi Sylviane,

How true, showing interest in one form or another (target market) A sales page must push all the right buttons in solving your problem/problems by sparking your emotions.

A good sales page has to make you feel it can solve your problem/problems other wise you are not going to buy anything.

Sales copy at times is so good there is a danger though. That danger is the product is not up to the standards of the sales copy. I’m sure it has happened to us all, perhaps more than once.

It’s funny but the sales copy (the marketing) is better than the product itself. As marketers we must always keep in mind that honesty is the best policy. It is also good practice to over deliver to stand out from the crowd.

Exceeding the customers expectations is very important in todays market place.

Terry Conti

Reply

6 Sylviane Nuccio June 25, 2012 at 10:30 PM

Hi Terry,

I totally agree with you and what you are saying.

You want to make sure that your sales copy is not better than the product itself and that does happen. We all known that.

Heck I have bought products myself that were not even nearly as good as the sales copy. So, there is most definitely a challenge here and its called honesty. Of course we are also protected by the money back guarantee in case we are really disappointed by the product.

Thank you for your thoughtful feedbacks, Terry and thanks for coming :)

Reply

7 Patricia Gozlan June 26, 2012 at 12:07 PM

Hi Sylviane,
I enjoyed reading your post as I am always curious about the psychology behind the words in the sales process.
A page that does not make bull’s eye for our prospects is like the main actor in LIE TO ME episodes that identifies the micro movements and detects and incongruency when someone lies;)
Thanks for sharing this is important stuff for all of us!

Reply

8 Mika Castro June 26, 2012 at 12:12 PM

Test is also important. Of all the elements you can include on your landing page, nothing will give you more bang for your buck than the form. Being the part of the page the user interacts with most, as well as being directly involved in the conversion process means the form has an outsized impact on how well your page converts.

Reply

9 Sylviane Nuccio June 27, 2012 at 11:58 PM

Hi Mika,

Thank you for your feedbacks. You seem to be an expert at that :)

Reply

10 Ileane June 27, 2012 at 12:38 AM

Nicely done Sylviane. I’ve never been good and creating sales pages, but I see where you’re coming from in this post. Part of the challenge for me is that I never want to read a sales page – even when I’m interested in buying a product. I just want to see how it works :) Thanks for the encouragement.

Reply

11 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:01 AM

Hi Ileane,

Thanks for coming.

I understand you completely, I don’t always want to read a long sales page either, but a few times when I really was interested in a product I did read the sales page. All of it. when I do however, since I also know the other side of it I really try to see what is true and what sounds fake.

Thanks for your feedback, Ileane

Reply

12 David Merrill June 27, 2012 at 1:31 AM

The sales page is critical, as you point out Sylviane.

It is WHERE you convert a reader into a buyer. People buying stuff makes your online enterprise a business rather than a hobby.

That said, I actually teach my team to NOT sell a product.

That’s because nobody wants a product. Everyone wants to make their lives better. A product is just a tool to do that, and a tool that few people are interested in for its own intrinsic value.

So try “illustrating” (not outlining, convincing or anything else). Try illustrating the kind of life your reader will have if they buy your product. Remember, no matter how intelligent they are, buying is not an intellectual task. It is ALWAYS an emotional one, no matter how calculating a buyer tries to be.

Paint a picture, tell a story, RELATE to your reader, viewer or visitor and you will never have to sell them anything. They will gladly seek you out to gain your assistance and continue to build their relationship with you (and in the process will pay you for your delivery).

Reply

13 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:12 AM

Hi David,

You are so right. I remember when I read Magnetic Sponsoring by Mike Dillard, there is a quote mentioned there that says: “people don’t want to buy a drill, they want a hole”. This goes along with what you are saying. Selling them the product is more like selling them a solution. I totally agree.

And, no, intelligence has nothing to do with buying. As I mentioned in the post and as you are pointing out, people buy on emotions.

Thank you for your very interesting insights, David :)

Reply

14 Donna MerrillTwitter: donna_tribe June 27, 2012 at 4:10 AM

Great tips, especially for me. I’m considering getting back into the network marketing place and am going through so many thoughts and ideas before I opt in.

There are many ways to talk to people like you point out. It is all in the communication. That I have got down. I know I can be good at that.
At this time, I’m considering the product and who would need that, especially on an emotional level. As I go through all these thoughts, your post has helped.
I’m making a list of potential prospects that want the product I want to sell.
It is becoming more clear in my mind. This post helped so much,
I thank you,
Donna
Donna Merrill invites you to read..The 80/20 RuleMy Profile

Reply

15 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:17 AM

Hi Donna,

Here you are closely following your husband, who gave some great feedbacks, by the way :)

I have so glad if this post helped you at the right time.

A lot can be said about how to write a sales page, but it really comes down to the potential buyer, what you have for them and how you convey what you have. I firmly believe that if you keep these in mind, you can’t go wrong.

Good success with your new venture, Donna :)

Reply

16 Jacob June 27, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Very true, in a sales letter/page the more target the better. We want to write for a person and not a group of people. Make it feel like the sales letter was written just for them will have a better emotional impact.

Reply

17 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:20 AM

Hi Jacob,

So very true. Write as if you are talking to that one person, just for them, and you will make sales left and right. That is the secret of knowing how to write the “message” of your sales letter.

Thanks for your input, Jacob :)

Reply

18 Rosemary June 27, 2012 at 6:44 AM

Hi Sylviane,

You have made some excellent points in this post. It is so true how important it is to understand how people react to emotions while buying products. That is an important point about how branding works and why people emotions direct when buying one brand rather than another. Take care Rosemary

Reply

19 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:23 AM

Hi Rosemary,

So true, that’s how banding works. Why are you going to buy the same thing, but from that brand rather than that one? It’s all about emotions.

Thank for this, Rosemary :)

Reply

20 Jeevanjacobjohn June 27, 2012 at 3:52 PM

Hey Sylviane,

I haven’t created a sales page, not yet. But, I am of course, going to when I finish my upcoming Kindle Book.

I haven’t thought much about sales page, mainly because I am still in the writing stage. But, I do appreciate your thoughts.

I agree with you on using emotion to convert. People do buy based on their wants – which are based on emotion.

Like you mentioned, the best way to go with emotion is to tie in the challenge/problem to the equation (we could also do a back story – how it all started, but then again, that is used too much these days. So, I have to question the effectiveness of it).

The most important point of a sales page is the message itself. How we say it – how it can solve a certain problem of the potential buyer.I have considered these things for my Kindle Book.

The book is about relationship marketing, so the certain problem I am addressing is time – how we could build relationships fast and how we could use that in an effective way to drive the most traffic (I could say that is a ton of problems – instead of one – maybe I need to narrow down a little).

Anyways, thank you for the post, Sylviane! Appreciate it as always.

Jeevan Jacob John

Reply

21 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:29 AM

Hi Jeevan,

Hum another product coming up!

When your book is all done and wrapped, yes, you are going to have to write that dear sales page. Make sure you remember the person you want to sell to, tell them how they will benefit from your product and tell them in a way that goes beyond selling but rather how can you live without this! :) If you do it well, you won’t even have to sell them. They will be sold!

All the success with your upcoming product. Let us know when it’s ready :)

Reply

22 Nimsrules June 27, 2012 at 8:52 PM

I think I’m gonna implement them on my Amazon affiliate listings. Great points!

Reply

23 Sylviane Nuccio June 28, 2012 at 12:30 AM

Hi Nimsrules,

Welcome here and I’m glad if this could help you. Hope to see you again soon.

Reply

24 Cat Alexandra June 28, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Hi Sylviane,

You did an incredible job on this post. This is actually a topic on the forefront of my mind right now because I’m in the process of developing some sales funnels for my Seacret Direct business and I’m working on some ideas for different sales pages which I’m testing out.

I also agree with what Adrienne said in how you “think” as a copywriter. We do need to keep the audience in our focus to make the sales page speak to them in a way that elicits the responses we intend. Looking to the commercial markets is indeed a smart way to get some ideas.

Again, you did a great job on this and I’m very grateful that it came in such a timely way!

Cat

Reply

25 Carol LynnTwitter: carollynnrivera June 28, 2012 at 7:59 PM

Hey, nice photo :)

I think one of the important things to remember when writing sales copy is to highlight benefits over features. That has a lot to do with your statement that people buy based on emotion. When someone lists a product’s features it’s just a laundry list of stuff that doesn’t relate to anyone’s life. But if you tell someone why that will be great for them, you will appeal to their emotional side. Like if you’re selling a bike and you say “it has three speeds!” – who cares? But if you tell me “You can go super fast so you’ll get home to dinner really quick when you’re hungry!” – now I care. Dumb example but I know you get it :)

I think a lot of people overlook your first point as well – you are speaking to a person, not an idiot! I doubt any company would admit to thinking their customers are idiots, but when they write it sometimes sounds like it. It’s like any good writing – a conversation.

I know YOU know it – glad you’re sharing it with the rest of the world :)
Carol Lynn invites you to read..Email Marketing In The Dead Zone: Are You Training Your List To Ignore You?My Profile

Reply

26 Ilka Flood June 29, 2012 at 2:07 AM

Hi Sylviane,

Great message! I think all three points are equally important. You can’t write an effective sales message by leaving either one of them out.

And oh, do I ever know what you are talking about when you talk about those stupid commercials. Sometimes I can only shake my head. But you know what, sometimes, the more stupid a commercial is the more it sticks in people’ s heads. It’s kinda funny like that.

Ah the emotional strings, do they ever work so well. You can wrap people around your little finger if you play your emotional cards right. Pssst, don’t tell anyone, but I’m a sucker for emotions as well :)

Great stuff, Sylviane!

All the best,

Ilka

Reply

27 Sylviane Nuccio July 2, 2012 at 2:21 AM

Hi Ilka,

Yes, all three points are equally important because one can’t do without the other.

When it comes to commercials, I think that the more stupid are medicine and detergent commercials. If you really pay attention to some of them, they sound retarded :)

Emotion is everything and that’s what sells, indeed!

Thanks for coming, Ilka :)

Reply

28 Christine Brady June 29, 2012 at 2:58 AM

Hi Sylviane,

Although not my strongest area of expertise, I love copywriting and love learning about it!

I think a lot of what trips people up in the whole copywriting process is the fear of it being too hard.

You just proved that by following simple steps and keeping your buyer top of mind, writing copy does not have to be complicated.

I’m all for keeping things simple – love how you outlined it all simply!

~Christine

Reply

29 Sylviane Nuccio July 2, 2012 at 2:24 AM

Hi Christine and welcome here.

You’ve got a point, a lot of people see copy writing as a hard thing to do, but that’s also the copy writers that portrait it that way. So, in a way they are largely responsible for this belief.

Thanks for your feedbacks, Christine :)

Reply

30 MayuraTwitter: MayuraDeSilva June 30, 2012 at 5:57 PM

Hi Sylviane,

First of all, I love the picture on your post dear ;) Like you’ve said, these components are not limited to the sales pages. I can see how it can be applied for our blog posts too.

You are indicating an vital point about potential buyer dear. For bloggers, it’s knowing our audience, right? :) And “Online track record”. Absolutely, I’ve had no idea about it until I read this. Anyway it matters if we don’t write from our own experience. no?

Most time when I write about a tool or service I can recommend, I see users more careful about how they can be applied for them. I mean, eventhough I point out features, people wants to know how it helps to fix THEIR problems. They need “holes” not “drills” :)

Sometimes I need to read whole thing to know that isn’t addressing me or my problem. So we have to careful about actually what concerns we have in our copy. Isn’t it dear? :) I’d like to know more about it from you.

It’s very true ~ “It’s not what you say it’s how you say it”. I’ve experienced many times how such writings convince me to go for it or to try another one. I didn’t know that he’s writing a good sales page, but the thing is it attracts me and make me wanna buy.

Really helpful post dear :) I’m not a copywriter but I’ve read it from the point of view of a blogger and a client.

Cheers…
Mayura invites you to read..How to Add a Contact Form to Your Website with ContactMeMy Profile

Reply

31 Sylviane Nuccio July 2, 2012 at 2:33 AM

Hi Mayura,

I’m glad you liked the picture. Cat pictures are always my favorites.

To answer your first question, and if I understand it correctly, when you can write from your own experience or from something you’ve learned it’s always better.

When I purchase a product from a sales page I always read the whole thing, I think that it’s a good thing to do before you click on the “buy now” button.

I’m glad you enjoy the post, Mayura and the picture too :)

Reply

32 Raena Lynn July 1, 2012 at 7:42 PM

Hi Sylviane,

This is a great post and I enjoyed reading the responses. It seems as everyone covered everything I wanted to say, so I would like to make a couple of comments on the responses. First, I really like what David Merrill said:

“Paint a picture, tell a story, RELATE to your reader, viewer or visitor and you will never have to sell them anything. They will gladly seek you out to gain your assistance and continue to build their relationship with you (and in the process will pay you for your delivery).”

My understanding is that sales copy can use this approach and I agree. However, a marketer who has not developed his/her influence will probably make a decision to sell a product, whether it is their own product or an affiliate product. Therefore, your three components for sales copy are right on target. In other words, if a sales page is going to be set up, your components are what is needed to convert readers into buyers. Add David’s comments to RELATE, and it’s a win!

Secondly, Terry Conti mentioned creating sales copy that is better than the product. I’ve personally experienced that! It comes down to being honest with the sales copy and not putting in hype. I think that is damaging because after purchasing products from a “master marketers” that delivers less than offered caused me to lose respect for that type of marketing with no returns.

Finally, people purchase by emotion so that has to be considered, as you mentioned. The sales copy has to dig deeper into the struggle, pain, or convenience for the potential buyer. Give your audience credit for being intelligent. People are not idiots and you will not fool them. Excellent article! Thanks!

Raena Lynn

Reply

33 Sylviane Nuccio July 2, 2012 at 2:44 AM

Hi Raena,

Well, thank you for your excellent comment. Lot of things here.

You commented on two excellent and thought provoking comments. As David Merrill said, painting a picture of the product is really something that works great to sale a product. Telling what that can do for them.

Then, like you I could relate to Terry’s comment that some copies are better than the product. Gosh, I’ve purchase such products. Like you are saying it comes down to being honest with are sales page, and that problem shouldn’t exist.

Thank you for your feedbacks, Raena :)

Reply

34 LisaTwitter: Lisapatb July 19, 2012 at 10:03 AM

Nice post Sylvia, I’ve been reading more on how to create better product pages and offering a solution. I’m not sure I fully understand the emotional part of it. I just did one for a new women’s top that has anti-wrinkle fabric and I worded it “Who has time to wait for the dryer? This fabric has anti-wrinkle technology and quick drying material. Is that what offering solution is? Not sure how to put the emotional aspect of it together. Maybe using the word feel in it. (Like: Do you feel like waiting for your clothes in the dryer?) I liked Carol’s example of the bike. I’ll have to think more like that. Thanks for this topic!
Lisa invites you to read..Emails Are Alive, Kicking and Making SalesMy Profile

Reply

35 Sylviane Nuccio October 14, 2012 at 12:33 PM

Hi Lisa,

This is surely a long time coming reply to this question. I’m sorry I missed your comment. Sometimes when comment are left later it’s easy to miss them.

The example you give is a very good one. When I say putting an “emotional” factor that’s just that. “Who has time to wait for the dryer”, this does include an emotional factor. Not having enough time to do something you’re got to do is emotional. Now as you mention if you use the word “feel” you even add more to it. I think you’ve got the point, though!

Reply

Leave a Comment

 

CommentLuv badge

This blog uses premium CommentLuv which allows you to put your keywords with your name if you have had [2] approved comments. Use your real name and then @ your keywords (maximum of [4])

Previous post:

Next post: